Auction 130 Unlimited Belongings of Tzaddikim, Manuscripts, Rabbinical letters and Rare books, Antisemitism, Zionism and Yiddish culture
Jul 20, 2021
3 Shatner Center 1st Floor Givat Shaul Jerusalem, Israel

The auction has ended

LOT 42:

Nazi Poster - Notification of the Establishment of the Lvov Ghetto, Signed by the German Chief of Police in Ulrich ...

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Start price:
$ 400
Estimated price:
$800 - $1,200
Buyer's Premium: 24%
VAT: 17% On commission only
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Nazi Poster - Notification of the Establishment of the Lvov Ghetto, Signed by the German Chief of Police in Ulrich, July, 1942


The poster is written in Ukrainian with a Galician dialect. It specifies the streets designated for the new Jewish ghetto. The Aryan population living on these streets is required by law to vacate their homes by September 1942. They are welcome to contact the police in order to receive an alternative residence. Opposition to this order will result in fines of up to 1,000 gulden, and even prison sentences of up to 3 months.

The Nazi officer who signed this order was Albert Ulrich, police chief of the city who previously ordered the cruel aktions there.

As stated, this instruction was meant to concentrate the Jews in one area to be hermetically sealed by constructing a wall around it. Jews were forced to construct this wall at their own expense. The Jewish area was reduced in size, and in September of 1942, construction of the wall officially turned it into a ghetto. From that time, any Jew found outside ghetto walls was a dead man.

At the outbreak of WWII, there were 100,000 Jews living in Lvov. When the Soviet army retreated in the summer of 1941, there were cruel pogroms carried out by the Ukrainians against the Jewish population. In November 1941, a ghetto was established in the city, centered in the Jewish neighborhoods. Jews from surrounding areas were relocated there, and the Lvov ghetto became the third-largest ghetto overall. There were mass murders carried out there, as well as deportations to death camps. However, the ghetto was not hermetically sealed. There were also Ukrainians living in the Jewish neighborhoods. In the summer of 1942, the Germans carried out several operations to reduce the area of the ghetto and completely separate the Jewish population that still lived there from the Christian population. In the end, in September of 1942, the ghetto area was surrounded by a wall.


42x29 cm. Ukrainian-Galician dialect.


Fine condition. Fold mark in the center, tear several centimetres long on the left, aging stains.


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